Help Needed Describing Compounds - Willing To Pay

Basic questions from students; resources for projects and reports.

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Hi Everyone

I recently had an an GC-MS screen and comparison of volatiles test did on an alcohol brand i own.

I need help describing both the positive and negative compounds mentioned in the report.

For example one of the positive compounds was Alpha-Pinene. I would like a simple description of this compound and why it is a positive compound to a human.

There is a lot more that need describing. I could simply google each compound but i am afraid there is so much false info online that i may end up publishing a false description so need someone to help that knows what they are talking about.

As i said i am willing to pay for help. Many thanks in-advance.
When you say "positive and negative" compounds, are you referring to health benefits? If the company that did the analysis separated them into positives and negatives, they should be able to give you the literature supporting whether they're positive and negative.

While I do agree that health claims over certain compounds can be exaggerated, it's mostly from companies trying to sell you something. As long as you don't go crazy with the claims, you should be okay. In your example: Alpha-pinene... stick to what wiki has that's cited:

- Anti-inflammatory
- Acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, aiding in memory and increasing alertness
- Contributes to smell and taste, particularly piney-woody smells

Not over the top with claims, and can be backed with scientific literature.
Hi Jesse, yes they gave me the positive and negative compounds in separate columns.

When you say "positive and negative" compounds, are you referring to health benefits? Yes

I got no literature supporting each compound just a list of the compounds found. With each compound being placed in a positive or negative column.

I also needed a little help understanding the report. Thank you in advance.
I really need help describing the positive health benefits of the positive compounds as when i google some of the compounds i get nothing but research papers and a load of stuff i can not even start to understand

Example beta-Selinene

I just want to know what Scientifically PROVEN health benefits it has...

Hope someone has the time to help with this and wished to make a bit cash.

Thanks
synergyuk10 wrote:
I got no literature supporting each compound just a list of the compounds found. With each compound being placed in a positive or negative column.

I also needed a little help understanding the report. Thank you in advance.



Right. What I'm suggesting is that they put the compounds into one column or another... the must have some reason/rationale for doing so. If you already paid for the analysis, I'd ask for supporting information and/or how they placed the compounds into one column vs the other.

With understanding the report, again, I'd suggest asking the company that provided you with the report any questions you may have. You've already spent the money, why not try to get the most out of it.
Because MS was involved, I rather suspect that "positive" and "negative" in this context refers to the charge on the ions detected, not to any health effects.
-- Tom Jupille
LC Resources / Separation Science Associates
tjupille@lcresources.com
+ 1 (925) 297-5374
Hi Tom, this is what i have basically

Introduction 2 samples of spirits were received on the 29th November. The client required a GC-MS screen and comparison of volatiles of the samples. The samples were coded as:
280842 -Sample A
280843 – Sample B

Portions of the samples (5ml) were sealed into a headspace vial. Volatiles were extracted from the headspace by solid phase microextraction (SPME: 85 μm Polyacrylate coated fibre) by equilibration for 20 minutes at 40 C. The volatiles were desorbed by injection into a GC-MS. The GC, fitted with a polar (ZB-WAX) capillary column, was temperature-programmed from 50 to 260 C and the mass spectrometer was operated in scanning mode over the mass range 40 – 350 amu. The NIST database was used for identification of compounds.

Analysis results The GC-MS chromatograms of the samples are shown as an overlay in figure 1 and separated in figure 2. Figure 3 shows an overlay with the baseline region enlarged to illustrate the comparison of minor peaks. Peak identifications of the principal components in the samples are listed in table 1.

Then below the graphs is a list of the compounds

Sample Generally regarded as positive attributes

Generally regarded as negative attributes
Hi Guys I emailed the company that did the analysis, this was more or less their reply

The report shows which compounds have positive and negative impacts on the flavour of the products, we did this by searching various sources for their aroma and flavour characteristics, the report does not show which have positive and negative benefits to human health
==================
Anyway i am still looking for someone to help me describe these compounds, here is a list of the positive compounds

Alpha-Pinene
beta-Pinene
Camphene
beta-Myrcene
alpha-Terpinene
D-Limonene
beta-Phellandrene
Eucalyptol
cis-Ocimene
gamma-Terpinene
beta-Ocimene
alpha-Terpinolene
delta-Elemene
alpha-Copaene
beta-Bourbonene
Linalool
alpha-Santalene
trans alpha-Bergamotene
beta-Elemene
Carophyllene
gamma-Muurolene
alpha-Muurolene
beta-Selinene
Cinnamaldehyde

I am happy to pay $100 or more for someone to describe the benefits to human health is any, only the benefits that have been scientifically proven.

Example

Alpha-Pinene has been scientifically proven to be
- Anti-inflammatory
- Acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, aiding in memory and increasing alertness
- Contributes to smell and taste, particularly piney-woody smells

can pay via paypal
It sounds to me that they explicitly stated that they are making no comments on health benefits, but only on taste/aroma.

Getting someone to agree to tell you what has been scientifically "proven" may be difficult. Many would argue that such a thing doesn't exist. What CAN be done is look at data gathered and draw a conclusion on what that data shows.

Medical research, specifically, though, is often all over the place and typically a health institute(WHO, NIH, etc) won't make a recommendation on something until the data overwhelming points to a positive/negative imapct from something.

My best advice would be to get on PubMed and see what you can find on those site. Yes, it's technical. You MIGHT have some more luck if you find articles in the first place and ask someone to help you understand/interpret them. You should know, though, that in general access to scientific/academic search engines is often very expensive(PubMed is the exception) and full text articles(that are not public access) are equally as expensive.

Many of us on here have access to such things through our employers/affiliated institutions. With that said, using that information for things outside the scope of our employment is often strictly forbidden both by the institutions and the publishers themselves. That can cause someone agreeing to do it to both lose their job, and their institution to lose access or have to pay a hefty fine to the publisher. So, that's not a risk most on here qualified to do it is willing to take. Someone who CAN do it without running afoul of the user agreements is likely going to want a whole lot more than $100-you're talking likely a couple of days of time finding articles, reading them, and then putting together the results. That's also not counting if the person doing it is on a per-article and/or per-search access plan, where that $100 could easily evaporate in a half hour of searching.
Thanks Ben, i will take a look and heed your advice, all the best and thank you...
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