Agilent 6890 anatomy - unbending hardware

Discussions about GC and other "gas phase" separation techniques.

6 posts Page 1 of 1
I recently "adopted" a 6890 that has had a hard life; looks like someone dropped it a few times. I removed the left hand panel, and found it wasn't attached correctly. When I tried to attach it the right way, I found out the aluminum frame inside was bent.

Image

It's too sturdy to straighten out without removing it. There are several rivets I can just drill out, but I don't know if there are any on the underside. Anyone know if this plate is attached anywhere from underneath?

My other question is with the split/splitless inlet. One of the supply lines to the inlet is terminated in a compression fitting.

Image

Is this normal? Why would anyone do this?

I'm also missing an inlet cooling fan cover (G1530-40200), and a G1530-00610 pneumatics cover. If you have one or the other laying around, drop me a line.
Don't know about the side panel. As far as the swagged line to the inlet, it was for attaching a P&T or head space sampler. Follow the uncut line and you should find another line that should be connected to the other side of the compression fitting. Alternatively you can purchase a new inlet top, you just have to see what type of split filter you have.
Big Bear is correct. I had a similar situation. If you can find the outlet of the EPC for the inlet, you should be able to simply reconnect that with the inlet using the other side of that union.

Here's a shot of mine. We retired an old purge-and-trap sampler and now use the GC for SPME analysis.

https://flic.kr/p/28ebXWf
Another trick that will make inlet maintenance easier, move the lines for the inlet to go across the top of the oven instead of in the cramped space under the blue cover. There is a slot on both sides of the inlet in the top so it can be configured either way. If the lines are run on top of the oven, when you do maintenance you can lift the top completely away as it will no longer be limited in movement by the very short length of lines that is able to come through the slot if it comes from outer side of the instrument.
The past is there to guide us into the future, not to dwell in.
rb6banjo wrote:
Big Bear is correct. I had a similar situation. If you can find the outlet of the EPC for the inlet, you should be able to simply reconnect that with the inlet using the other side of that union.

Here's a shot of mine. We retired an old purge-and-trap sampler and now use the GC for SPME analysis.

https://flic.kr/p/28ebXWf

Same here I had an old Tekmar 2000 on my 6890 and then got a Gerstel MPS 2 so I rejoined the line with a Swagelok union. Start at the EPC at the top back and follow the carrier gas line then rejoin.
Well, I figured out how to unbend it enough I could get the case on. I bought a clamp large enough to fit from left to right, then used a wooden chock on the right side to prevent damage to the case. I then clamped it down and tightened the clamp to push in the bent part.

That still wasn't enough, as there was some hysteresis once the clamp was removed. So I clamped it tight, drilled a hole through the aluminum and put a pop rivet in place to anchor it tight. Now the case fits back on. I did some very careful prep and vacuuming to make certain no aluminum chips were left to short anything out.

Total kludge, but it never would have worked any other way.
6 posts Page 1 of 1

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